Welcome to The Nabokovian!

Welcome to the official site of the International Vladimir Nabokov Society (IVNS). You can access most of the site as you wish, but to add to or edit material wiki-style, as we would love you to do, you will have to register to the site by following the protocol spelled out below.

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New Feature: Classics from The Nabokovian

Introducing a new feature: read classic articles from the archives of the print version of The Nabokovian. Selected by the site's editors, articles will be featured free of charge and will vary quarterly. Full access to all of the print and electronic issues of The Nabokovian are available on this site to members of the International Vladimir Nabokov Society (IVNS). To join, please go here.

Our inaugural article is Gennady Barabtarlo's "See under Sebastian," The Nabokovian 1990.24: 24-28. Enjoy your reading!

 

News

CFP Nabokov and the Five Senses

Submitted by Marie Bouchet on Thu, 06/21/2018 - 17:16

“Do the Senses Make Sense?”: The Five Senses in Nabokov’s Work

 

After the successful Biarritz conference on the topic, the French Vladimir Nabokov Society invites scholars for further contributions on the importance and significance of the Five Senses in Nabokov’s work, poetics and aesthetics, for the publication based on the conference.

2019 MLA Nabokov Session and Abstracts

Submitted by zoran_kuzmanovich on Tue, 06/19/2018 - 11:04

MLA 2019 Convention (Chicago)  Session: Dreaming with Nabokov

 

Chair: Dr Thomas Karshan (University of East Anglia, President of the International Vladimir Nabokov Society)

1. Professor Jennifer Sears (New York City College of Technology): ‘Kissing Her Ellipses: Dreams and Narrative Texture in Nabokov’s “Ultima Thule”’

New version of Nabokov's Eugene Onegin translation

Submitted by Brian_Boyd on Mon, 06/18/2018 - 05:36
For the wealthy Nabokov completist, or for those who can recommend books to their university's rare books collection, Arion Press, San Francisco, has published this month, June 2018, a limited fine edition of Nabokov's Eugene Onegin translation, in a form even better than he ideally envisaged: the Cyrillic text interleaved with the stress-marked transliteration of the Russian on the inner half of each page (transliteration and stress-marking prepared by Stanislav Shvabrin), and the translation on the outer.